Anne Martin-Matthews

Professor
phone 604 822 2574
location_on AnSo-3129

Research Area

Education

Ph.D., McMaster University
M.A., McMaster University
B.A., Memorial University

About

Other Affiliations

Associate Vice-President, Health, UBC
Faculty Associate, Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, UBC
Member of the Common Room, Green College, UBC

Biography

Anne Martin-Matthews has returned to UBC as of July 1, 2018, following a 14 month secondment as Acting Vice-President, Research, Knowledge Translation and Ethics, for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) in Ottawa. Prior to that, she completed two terms (2004-2011) as the Scientific Director of the Institute of Aging, one of 13 national Institutes of the CIHR. Since coming to UBC in 1998, she has held positions as Associate Dean Research, Associate Dean Strategic Initiatives, and Dean pro tem in the Faculty of Arts. She has been a member of the Department of Sociology since 2008. Prior to coming to UBC, she was founding Director of the pan-University Gerontology Research Centre, and member of the Department of Family Studies, at the University of Guelph (1978-1997).

Under her leadership, the CIHR Institute of Aging led the development of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA), a 20 year study of 50,000 Canadians aged 45-85. The CLSA was launched in 2009. The Institute of Aging has also developed strategic initiatives on Cognitive Impairment in Aging, on Mobility in Aging, and on Health Services and Systems for an Aging Population.

Professor Martin-Matthews’ publications include two books, Aging and Caring at the Intersection of Work and Home Life: Blurring the Boundaries (2008); Widowhood in Later Life (1990); three edited volumes (on methodology; policy development; and Canadian gerontology in international context); and over 180 papers on health and social care, aging and social support, work – family balance, and rural aging.

She is Immediate Past President of the Research Committee on Aging of the International Sociological Association (President, 2010-2014). A former Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journal on Aging (1996-2000), she is a member of the editorial boards of Ageing and Society (UK) and the Journal of Aging Studies (US).

Anne Martin-Matthews has served on review and scientific advisory committees for provincial funding agencies and government ministries in Ontario and British Columbia, and for national and federal agencies, including Health Canada and Veterans Affairs Canada. Internationally, she currently serves on scientific advisory boards for CLOSER: Cohorts and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resource, a joint initiative of the (UK) Medical Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council; for EXTEND: Social inequalities in extending working lives of an ageing workforce, European Commission Joint Programming Initiative, hosted by the University of Dortmund, Germany; and for the Centre of Excellence in Research on Ageing and Care, Academy of Finland.

In Canada, she serves on the International Scientific Advisory Council for AGEWELL- the Network of Centre of Excellence in aging and technology; the Research Council of CIFAR: the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research; and is a Member of the Laureate Selection Committee of the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

In recognition of her creation of an annual interdisciplinary and national Summer School in Aging (SPA) run by the CIHR Institute of Aging; an international collaboration (with Italy and Sweden) in the creation of an International Summer School in Aging, and her mentoring of a generation of trainees in aging research in Canada, she has been awarded the Canadian Association on Gerontology’s Evelyn Shapiro Recognition Award for Excellence in Student Mentoring (2016) and a UBC Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring (2017). In 2012, CIHR created the “Anne Martin-Matthews Doctoral Research Prize of Excellence in Research on Aging”, in recognition of her “commitment to the mentoring of the next generation of researchers on aging”. It is awarded annually to a top-ranked doctoral student in aging in Canada.

Anne Martin-Matthews is a Fellow of the (U.S.) Gerontological Society of America and of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. She holds a Distinguished Alumnus Award from McMaster University, and a Commemorative Medal for the Golden Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, from the Canadian Association on Gerontology, and for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, from the Government of Canada. In recognition of her research commitments to the field of aging, she was awarded an Honorary Degree in Civil Law from Newcastle University (UK) in 2010, and was inducted as an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2018.


Research

Research Topics

Aging and lifecourse; health and society; health and social care services especially home and community care; intersections of formal and informal care, especially involving the nexus of the public and private spheres; transitional life events such as widowhood.

Research Interests

My current research focuses on two areas of inquiry in the sociology of aging. The first examines the provision of health and social care to elderly people, examined from the perspectives, agency providers, home care workers, elderly clients, and family carers. The focus is on three points of intersection: the nexus of public and private spheres, where workers provide publicly funded services in the private home sphere; of professional and non-professional labour, examining relationships between employers, co-workers, clients and caregivers; and of paid and unpaid labour, focusing on the emotional vs contractual nature of ‘care’, provision of unpaid time to meet client need, and the unpaid labour of family and friends in ‘sharing’ of care.  This CIHR-funded project, Home Care in Canada: Caring at the Nexus of the Public and the Private Spheres (http://nexushomecare.arts.ubc.ca/), examines data from British Columbia, Ontario and Nova Scotia.

My second area of research interest is on widowhood in later life, focusing on the ways in which widowhood is experienced and understood in conjunction with other lifecourse events, such as immigration. Cultural representations of widowhood in research, literature, artistic and other information formats are also of interest.


Publications

Selected Publications:  Articles and Chapters

Martin-Matthews, A. & Cloutier, D. S.  (2018), “Household spaces of ageing: when care ‘comes home’”. Ch. 14 in Skinner, M., Andrews, G., & Cutchin, M. (eds.) Geographical Gerontology: Perspectives, Concepts, Approaches. Routledge Studies in Human Geography Series.

Martin-Matthews, A. (2017). “‘Doing Family’: Lenses, Patterns and Futures”. Ch 15 in Gazso, A. &  Kobayashi, K.M. (eds.), Continuity and Innovation: Canadian Families in the New Millennium, Toronto: Nelson Publishing.

Tong, C. E., Byrne, K., Sims-Gould, J., & Martin-Matthews, A. (2016).  “Types and patterns of safety concerns in home care: client and family caregiver perspectives.” International Journal for Quality in Health Care. 28 (2): 214-220.    http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzw006

Cloutier, D. S., Martin-Matthews, A., Byrne, K.  & Wolsey, F. (2015). “The space between: Using ‘relational ethics’ and ‘relational space’ to explore relationship-building between care providers and care recipients in the home space”. Social and Cultural Geography. 16(7):764-782.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14649365.2015.1020336

Sims-Gould, J., Byrne, K., Tong, C. & Martin-Matthews, A. (2015). “Home support workers’ perceptions of family members of their older clients: A qualitative study”. BMC Geriatrics  (Vol 12, 2015): 15:165   http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-015-0163-4

Martin-Matthews, A., Tong, C., Rosenthal, C.J. & McDonald, L. (2013). “Ethno-cultural Diversity in the Experience of Widowhood in Later Life: Chinese Widows in Canada.”  Journal of Aging Studies. 27(4): 507-518.

https://doi-org.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/10.1016/j.jaging.2012.12.011

Martin-Matthews, A., Tong, C. E. & Sims-Gould, J. (2013). “The realities and challenges of home care policies in Canada: Client, family, worker and manager perspectives”, Canadian Review of Social Policy. Special Issue on ‘Aging in Canada’  68/69: 55-74. http://ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1370183849?accountid=14656

Byrne, K., Frazee, K., Sims-Gould, J.  & Martin-Matthews, A.  (2012). "Valuing the older person in the context of delivery and receipt of home support: Client perspectives”, Journal of Applied Gerontology. 31(3): 377-401. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0733464810387578

Byrne, K., Frazee, K., Sims-Gould, J.  & Martin-Matthews, A.  (2011). “‘I’m satisfied... but’: Clients’ and families’ contingent responses about home care". Home Health Care Services Quarterly. 30 (4):161-177 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01621424.2011.622242

Martin-Matthews, A. (2011). “Revisiting Widowhood in Later Life: Changes in patterns and profiles, advances in research and understanding”. Canadian Journal on Aging 30(3): 339-354.   http://dx.doi:10.1017/S0714980811000201

Sims-Gould, J. & Martin-Matthews, A.  (2010). “‘We share the care’: Family caregivers’ experiences of their older relative receiving home support services", Health & Social Care in the Community, 18 (4): 415-423.   (Reprinted in Health and Social Care in the Community, Carers Virtual Issue.  August 2012). http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2524.2010.00913.x

Martin-Matthews, A., Sims-Gould, J.  & Naslund, J.  (2010). “Ethno-cultural diversity in home care work in Canada: Issues confronted, strategies employed”, International Journal of Ageing and Later Life 5 (2): 77-101. http://dx.doi.org/10.3384/ijal.1652-8670.105277

Martin-Matthews, A. (2007).  “Situating ‘home’ at the nexus of the public and private spheres: Aging, gender and home support work in Canada”, Current Sociology 55 (2), 229-249.  Reprinted 2012: Pp. 23-41 in M. Cutchin, C. Kemp & V. Marshall (eds.), Researching Social Gerontology, Volume I.  Sage Publications. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0011392107073305

Rosenthal, C. J., Martin-Matthews, A.  & Keefe, J.  (2007). "Families as care-providers versus care-managers? Gendered types of care in a sample of employed Canadians".  Ageing and Society, 27(5): 755 – 778*    http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0144686X07005995

 

Recent Presentations:

2018. “Family Ties & Aging in Changing and Challenging Times: When Care Comes Home”, oral presentation, RC 11 (Aging) session,  World Congress of the International Sociological Association, Toronto.

2018. “A (Self) Reflexive Lens on Gerontology: Over Time, Through Change, With Aging”, Inaugural William F. Forbes Lecture, Network for Aging Research, University of Waterloo. https://uwaterloo.ca/network-for-aging-research/events/william-forbes-lecture

2016. “Age-supportive environments, mobility and technology: Celebrating the past, looking to the future”, Invited keynote address, 10th Anniversary Symposium, CASE: Centre for Age Supportive Environments, University of Lund, Sweden.

2016. “Ways of knowing about aging, old age and widowhood in later life: Insights from social media”.  RC 11 (Aging) session "Digital Technologies, Ageing and Everyday Life", Third World Forum of Sociology, Vienna, Austria.


Anne Martin-Matthews

Professor
phone 604 822 2574
location_on AnSo-3129

Ph.D., McMaster University
M.A., McMaster University
B.A., Memorial University

Other Affiliations

Associate Vice-President, Health, UBC
Faculty Associate, Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, UBC
Member of the Common Room, Green College, UBC

Biography

Anne Martin-Matthews has returned to UBC as of July 1, 2018, following a 14 month secondment as Acting Vice-President, Research, Knowledge Translation and Ethics, for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) in Ottawa. Prior to that, she completed two terms (2004-2011) as the Scientific Director of the Institute of Aging, one of 13 national Institutes of the CIHR. Since coming to UBC in 1998, she has held positions as Associate Dean Research, Associate Dean Strategic Initiatives, and Dean pro tem in the Faculty of Arts. She has been a member of the Department of Sociology since 2008. Prior to coming to UBC, she was founding Director of the pan-University Gerontology Research Centre, and member of the Department of Family Studies, at the University of Guelph (1978-1997).

Under her leadership, the CIHR Institute of Aging led the development of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA), a 20 year study of 50,000 Canadians aged 45-85. The CLSA was launched in 2009. The Institute of Aging has also developed strategic initiatives on Cognitive Impairment in Aging, on Mobility in Aging, and on Health Services and Systems for an Aging Population.

Professor Martin-Matthews’ publications include two books, Aging and Caring at the Intersection of Work and Home Life: Blurring the Boundaries (2008); Widowhood in Later Life (1990); three edited volumes (on methodology; policy development; and Canadian gerontology in international context); and over 180 papers on health and social care, aging and social support, work – family balance, and rural aging.

She is Immediate Past President of the Research Committee on Aging of the International Sociological Association (President, 2010-2014). A former Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journal on Aging (1996-2000), she is a member of the editorial boards of Ageing and Society (UK) and the Journal of Aging Studies (US).

Anne Martin-Matthews has served on review and scientific advisory committees for provincial funding agencies and government ministries in Ontario and British Columbia, and for national and federal agencies, including Health Canada and Veterans Affairs Canada. Internationally, she currently serves on scientific advisory boards for CLOSER: Cohorts and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resource, a joint initiative of the (UK) Medical Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council; for EXTEND: Social inequalities in extending working lives of an ageing workforce, European Commission Joint Programming Initiative, hosted by the University of Dortmund, Germany; and for the Centre of Excellence in Research on Ageing and Care, Academy of Finland.

In Canada, she serves on the International Scientific Advisory Council for AGEWELL- the Network of Centre of Excellence in aging and technology; the Research Council of CIFAR: the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research; and is a Member of the Laureate Selection Committee of the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

In recognition of her creation of an annual interdisciplinary and national Summer School in Aging (SPA) run by the CIHR Institute of Aging; an international collaboration (with Italy and Sweden) in the creation of an International Summer School in Aging, and her mentoring of a generation of trainees in aging research in Canada, she has been awarded the Canadian Association on Gerontology’s Evelyn Shapiro Recognition Award for Excellence in Student Mentoring (2016) and a UBC Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring (2017). In 2012, CIHR created the “Anne Martin-Matthews Doctoral Research Prize of Excellence in Research on Aging”, in recognition of her “commitment to the mentoring of the next generation of researchers on aging”. It is awarded annually to a top-ranked doctoral student in aging in Canada.

Anne Martin-Matthews is a Fellow of the (U.S.) Gerontological Society of America and of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. She holds a Distinguished Alumnus Award from McMaster University, and a Commemorative Medal for the Golden Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, from the Canadian Association on Gerontology, and for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, from the Government of Canada. In recognition of her research commitments to the field of aging, she was awarded an Honorary Degree in Civil Law from Newcastle University (UK) in 2010, and was inducted as an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2018.

Research Topics

Aging and lifecourse; health and society; health and social care services especially home and community care; intersections of formal and informal care, especially involving the nexus of the public and private spheres; transitional life events such as widowhood.

Research Interests

My current research focuses on two areas of inquiry in the sociology of aging. The first examines the provision of health and social care to elderly people, examined from the perspectives, agency providers, home care workers, elderly clients, and family carers. The focus is on three points of intersection: the nexus of public and private spheres, where workers provide publicly funded services in the private home sphere; of professional and non-professional labour, examining relationships between employers, co-workers, clients and caregivers; and of paid and unpaid labour, focusing on the emotional vs contractual nature of ‘care’, provision of unpaid time to meet client need, and the unpaid labour of family and friends in ‘sharing’ of care.  This CIHR-funded project, Home Care in Canada: Caring at the Nexus of the Public and the Private Spheres (http://nexushomecare.arts.ubc.ca/), examines data from British Columbia, Ontario and Nova Scotia.

My second area of research interest is on widowhood in later life, focusing on the ways in which widowhood is experienced and understood in conjunction with other lifecourse events, such as immigration. Cultural representations of widowhood in research, literature, artistic and other information formats are also of interest.

Selected Publications:  Articles and Chapters

Martin-Matthews, A. & Cloutier, D. S.  (2018), “Household spaces of ageing: when care ‘comes home’”. Ch. 14 in Skinner, M., Andrews, G., & Cutchin, M. (eds.) Geographical Gerontology: Perspectives, Concepts, Approaches. Routledge Studies in Human Geography Series.

Martin-Matthews, A. (2017). “‘Doing Family’: Lenses, Patterns and Futures”. Ch 15 in Gazso, A. &  Kobayashi, K.M. (eds.), Continuity and Innovation: Canadian Families in the New Millennium, Toronto: Nelson Publishing.

Tong, C. E., Byrne, K., Sims-Gould, J., & Martin-Matthews, A. (2016).  “Types and patterns of safety concerns in home care: client and family caregiver perspectives.” International Journal for Quality in Health Care. 28 (2): 214-220.    http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzw006

Cloutier, D. S., Martin-Matthews, A., Byrne, K.  & Wolsey, F. (2015). “The space between: Using ‘relational ethics’ and ‘relational space’ to explore relationship-building between care providers and care recipients in the home space”. Social and Cultural Geography. 16(7):764-782.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14649365.2015.1020336

Sims-Gould, J., Byrne, K., Tong, C. & Martin-Matthews, A. (2015). “Home support workers’ perceptions of family members of their older clients: A qualitative study”. BMC Geriatrics  (Vol 12, 2015): 15:165   http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-015-0163-4

Martin-Matthews, A., Tong, C., Rosenthal, C.J. & McDonald, L. (2013). “Ethno-cultural Diversity in the Experience of Widowhood in Later Life: Chinese Widows in Canada.”  Journal of Aging Studies. 27(4): 507-518.

https://doi-org.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/10.1016/j.jaging.2012.12.011

Martin-Matthews, A., Tong, C. E. & Sims-Gould, J. (2013). “The realities and challenges of home care policies in Canada: Client, family, worker and manager perspectives”, Canadian Review of Social Policy. Special Issue on ‘Aging in Canada’  68/69: 55-74. http://ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1370183849?accountid=14656

Byrne, K., Frazee, K., Sims-Gould, J.  & Martin-Matthews, A.  (2012). "Valuing the older person in the context of delivery and receipt of home support: Client perspectives”, Journal of Applied Gerontology. 31(3): 377-401. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0733464810387578

Byrne, K., Frazee, K., Sims-Gould, J.  & Martin-Matthews, A.  (2011). “‘I’m satisfied... but’: Clients’ and families’ contingent responses about home care". Home Health Care Services Quarterly. 30 (4):161-177 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01621424.2011.622242

Martin-Matthews, A. (2011). “Revisiting Widowhood in Later Life: Changes in patterns and profiles, advances in research and understanding”. Canadian Journal on Aging 30(3): 339-354.   http://dx.doi:10.1017/S0714980811000201

Sims-Gould, J. & Martin-Matthews, A.  (2010). “‘We share the care’: Family caregivers’ experiences of their older relative receiving home support services", Health & Social Care in the Community, 18 (4): 415-423.   (Reprinted in Health and Social Care in the Community, Carers Virtual Issue.  August 2012). http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2524.2010.00913.x

Martin-Matthews, A., Sims-Gould, J.  & Naslund, J.  (2010). “Ethno-cultural diversity in home care work in Canada: Issues confronted, strategies employed”, International Journal of Ageing and Later Life 5 (2): 77-101. http://dx.doi.org/10.3384/ijal.1652-8670.105277

Martin-Matthews, A. (2007).  “Situating ‘home’ at the nexus of the public and private spheres: Aging, gender and home support work in Canada”, Current Sociology 55 (2), 229-249.  Reprinted 2012: Pp. 23-41 in M. Cutchin, C. Kemp & V. Marshall (eds.), Researching Social Gerontology, Volume I.  Sage Publications. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0011392107073305

Rosenthal, C. J., Martin-Matthews, A.  & Keefe, J.  (2007). "Families as care-providers versus care-managers? Gendered types of care in a sample of employed Canadians".  Ageing and Society, 27(5): 755 – 778*    http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0144686X07005995

 

Recent Presentations:

2018. “Family Ties & Aging in Changing and Challenging Times: When Care Comes Home”, oral presentation, RC 11 (Aging) session,  World Congress of the International Sociological Association, Toronto.

2018. “A (Self) Reflexive Lens on Gerontology: Over Time, Through Change, With Aging”, Inaugural William F. Forbes Lecture, Network for Aging Research, University of Waterloo. https://uwaterloo.ca/network-for-aging-research/events/william-forbes-lecture

2016. “Age-supportive environments, mobility and technology: Celebrating the past, looking to the future”, Invited keynote address, 10th Anniversary Symposium, CASE: Centre for Age Supportive Environments, University of Lund, Sweden.

2016. “Ways of knowing about aging, old age and widowhood in later life: Insights from social media”.  RC 11 (Aging) session "Digital Technologies, Ageing and Everyday Life", Third World Forum of Sociology, Vienna, Austria.

Anne Martin-Matthews

Professor
phone 604 822 2574
location_on AnSo-3129

Ph.D., McMaster University
M.A., McMaster University
B.A., Memorial University

Other Affiliations

Associate Vice-President, Health, UBC
Faculty Associate, Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, UBC
Member of the Common Room, Green College, UBC

Biography

Anne Martin-Matthews has returned to UBC as of July 1, 2018, following a 14 month secondment as Acting Vice-President, Research, Knowledge Translation and Ethics, for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) in Ottawa. Prior to that, she completed two terms (2004-2011) as the Scientific Director of the Institute of Aging, one of 13 national Institutes of the CIHR. Since coming to UBC in 1998, she has held positions as Associate Dean Research, Associate Dean Strategic Initiatives, and Dean pro tem in the Faculty of Arts. She has been a member of the Department of Sociology since 2008. Prior to coming to UBC, she was founding Director of the pan-University Gerontology Research Centre, and member of the Department of Family Studies, at the University of Guelph (1978-1997).

Under her leadership, the CIHR Institute of Aging led the development of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA), a 20 year study of 50,000 Canadians aged 45-85. The CLSA was launched in 2009. The Institute of Aging has also developed strategic initiatives on Cognitive Impairment in Aging, on Mobility in Aging, and on Health Services and Systems for an Aging Population.

Professor Martin-Matthews’ publications include two books, Aging and Caring at the Intersection of Work and Home Life: Blurring the Boundaries (2008); Widowhood in Later Life (1990); three edited volumes (on methodology; policy development; and Canadian gerontology in international context); and over 180 papers on health and social care, aging and social support, work – family balance, and rural aging.

She is Immediate Past President of the Research Committee on Aging of the International Sociological Association (President, 2010-2014). A former Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journal on Aging (1996-2000), she is a member of the editorial boards of Ageing and Society (UK) and the Journal of Aging Studies (US).

Anne Martin-Matthews has served on review and scientific advisory committees for provincial funding agencies and government ministries in Ontario and British Columbia, and for national and federal agencies, including Health Canada and Veterans Affairs Canada. Internationally, she currently serves on scientific advisory boards for CLOSER: Cohorts and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resource, a joint initiative of the (UK) Medical Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council; for EXTEND: Social inequalities in extending working lives of an ageing workforce, European Commission Joint Programming Initiative, hosted by the University of Dortmund, Germany; and for the Centre of Excellence in Research on Ageing and Care, Academy of Finland.

In Canada, she serves on the International Scientific Advisory Council for AGEWELL- the Network of Centre of Excellence in aging and technology; the Research Council of CIFAR: the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research; and is a Member of the Laureate Selection Committee of the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

In recognition of her creation of an annual interdisciplinary and national Summer School in Aging (SPA) run by the CIHR Institute of Aging; an international collaboration (with Italy and Sweden) in the creation of an International Summer School in Aging, and her mentoring of a generation of trainees in aging research in Canada, she has been awarded the Canadian Association on Gerontology’s Evelyn Shapiro Recognition Award for Excellence in Student Mentoring (2016) and a UBC Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring (2017). In 2012, CIHR created the “Anne Martin-Matthews Doctoral Research Prize of Excellence in Research on Aging”, in recognition of her “commitment to the mentoring of the next generation of researchers on aging”. It is awarded annually to a top-ranked doctoral student in aging in Canada.

Anne Martin-Matthews is a Fellow of the (U.S.) Gerontological Society of America and of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. She holds a Distinguished Alumnus Award from McMaster University, and a Commemorative Medal for the Golden Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, from the Canadian Association on Gerontology, and for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, from the Government of Canada. In recognition of her research commitments to the field of aging, she was awarded an Honorary Degree in Civil Law from Newcastle University (UK) in 2010, and was inducted as an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2018.

Research Topics

Aging and lifecourse; health and society; health and social care services especially home and community care; intersections of formal and informal care, especially involving the nexus of the public and private spheres; transitional life events such as widowhood.

Research Interests

My current research focuses on two areas of inquiry in the sociology of aging. The first examines the provision of health and social care to elderly people, examined from the perspectives, agency providers, home care workers, elderly clients, and family carers. The focus is on three points of intersection: the nexus of public and private spheres, where workers provide publicly funded services in the private home sphere; of professional and non-professional labour, examining relationships between employers, co-workers, clients and caregivers; and of paid and unpaid labour, focusing on the emotional vs contractual nature of ‘care’, provision of unpaid time to meet client need, and the unpaid labour of family and friends in ‘sharing’ of care.  This CIHR-funded project, Home Care in Canada: Caring at the Nexus of the Public and the Private Spheres (http://nexushomecare.arts.ubc.ca/), examines data from British Columbia, Ontario and Nova Scotia.

My second area of research interest is on widowhood in later life, focusing on the ways in which widowhood is experienced and understood in conjunction with other lifecourse events, such as immigration. Cultural representations of widowhood in research, literature, artistic and other information formats are also of interest.

Selected Publications:  Articles and Chapters

Martin-Matthews, A. & Cloutier, D. S.  (2018), “Household spaces of ageing: when care ‘comes home’”. Ch. 14 in Skinner, M., Andrews, G., & Cutchin, M. (eds.) Geographical Gerontology: Perspectives, Concepts, Approaches. Routledge Studies in Human Geography Series.

Martin-Matthews, A. (2017). “‘Doing Family’: Lenses, Patterns and Futures”. Ch 15 in Gazso, A. &  Kobayashi, K.M. (eds.), Continuity and Innovation: Canadian Families in the New Millennium, Toronto: Nelson Publishing.

Tong, C. E., Byrne, K., Sims-Gould, J., & Martin-Matthews, A. (2016).  “Types and patterns of safety concerns in home care: client and family caregiver perspectives.” International Journal for Quality in Health Care. 28 (2): 214-220.    http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzw006

Cloutier, D. S., Martin-Matthews, A., Byrne, K.  & Wolsey, F. (2015). “The space between: Using ‘relational ethics’ and ‘relational space’ to explore relationship-building between care providers and care recipients in the home space”. Social and Cultural Geography. 16(7):764-782.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14649365.2015.1020336

Sims-Gould, J., Byrne, K., Tong, C. & Martin-Matthews, A. (2015). “Home support workers’ perceptions of family members of their older clients: A qualitative study”. BMC Geriatrics  (Vol 12, 2015): 15:165   http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-015-0163-4

Martin-Matthews, A., Tong, C., Rosenthal, C.J. & McDonald, L. (2013). “Ethno-cultural Diversity in the Experience of Widowhood in Later Life: Chinese Widows in Canada.”  Journal of Aging Studies. 27(4): 507-518.

https://doi-org.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/10.1016/j.jaging.2012.12.011

Martin-Matthews, A., Tong, C. E. & Sims-Gould, J. (2013). “The realities and challenges of home care policies in Canada: Client, family, worker and manager perspectives”, Canadian Review of Social Policy. Special Issue on ‘Aging in Canada’  68/69: 55-74. http://ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1370183849?accountid=14656

Byrne, K., Frazee, K., Sims-Gould, J.  & Martin-Matthews, A.  (2012). "Valuing the older person in the context of delivery and receipt of home support: Client perspectives”, Journal of Applied Gerontology. 31(3): 377-401. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0733464810387578

Byrne, K., Frazee, K., Sims-Gould, J.  & Martin-Matthews, A.  (2011). “‘I’m satisfied... but’: Clients’ and families’ contingent responses about home care". Home Health Care Services Quarterly. 30 (4):161-177 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01621424.2011.622242

Martin-Matthews, A. (2011). “Revisiting Widowhood in Later Life: Changes in patterns and profiles, advances in research and understanding”. Canadian Journal on Aging 30(3): 339-354.   http://dx.doi:10.1017/S0714980811000201

Sims-Gould, J. & Martin-Matthews, A.  (2010). “‘We share the care’: Family caregivers’ experiences of their older relative receiving home support services", Health & Social Care in the Community, 18 (4): 415-423.   (Reprinted in Health and Social Care in the Community, Carers Virtual Issue.  August 2012). http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2524.2010.00913.x

Martin-Matthews, A., Sims-Gould, J.  & Naslund, J.  (2010). “Ethno-cultural diversity in home care work in Canada: Issues confronted, strategies employed”, International Journal of Ageing and Later Life 5 (2): 77-101. http://dx.doi.org/10.3384/ijal.1652-8670.105277

Martin-Matthews, A. (2007).  “Situating ‘home’ at the nexus of the public and private spheres: Aging, gender and home support work in Canada”, Current Sociology 55 (2), 229-249.  Reprinted 2012: Pp. 23-41 in M. Cutchin, C. Kemp & V. Marshall (eds.), Researching Social Gerontology, Volume I.  Sage Publications. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0011392107073305

Rosenthal, C. J., Martin-Matthews, A.  & Keefe, J.  (2007). "Families as care-providers versus care-managers? Gendered types of care in a sample of employed Canadians".  Ageing and Society, 27(5): 755 – 778*    http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0144686X07005995

 

Recent Presentations:

2018. “Family Ties & Aging in Changing and Challenging Times: When Care Comes Home”, oral presentation, RC 11 (Aging) session,  World Congress of the International Sociological Association, Toronto.

2018. “A (Self) Reflexive Lens on Gerontology: Over Time, Through Change, With Aging”, Inaugural William F. Forbes Lecture, Network for Aging Research, University of Waterloo. https://uwaterloo.ca/network-for-aging-research/events/william-forbes-lecture

2016. “Age-supportive environments, mobility and technology: Celebrating the past, looking to the future”, Invited keynote address, 10th Anniversary Symposium, CASE: Centre for Age Supportive Environments, University of Lund, Sweden.

2016. “Ways of knowing about aging, old age and widowhood in later life: Insights from social media”.  RC 11 (Aging) session "Digital Technologies, Ageing and Everyday Life", Third World Forum of Sociology, Vienna, Austria.