Max Chewinski

Ph.D. Candidate

Research Area

Education

Ph.D., Sociology, University of British Columbia

M.A., Sociology, Carleton University, 2015

Honours B.A., Sociology, York University, 2012

Research

My research and writing encompasses the fields of environmental sociology, social movements and political sociology/economy.

Dissertation Research:

On August 4th, 2014, the Mount Polley copper-gold mine owned by Imperial Metals Corp had a catastrophic tailings collapse, sending 24 million cubic meters of tailings into Hazeltine Creek and Quesnel Lake. The disaster constitutes the largest tailings dam collapse in Canadian history, and one of largest in the world in the last 50 years.

My SSHRC-funded dissertation research focuses on how disasters provide opportunities and constraints for political engagement. More specifically, I focus on how:
(1) diverse media sources frame environmental risk, assign blame and promote possible solutions related to the spill over time
(2) how the public has participated in decision-making related to the disaster and subsequent resource management issues and
(3) why some residents have mobilized in response to the disaster while others have not

Supervisor: Dr. Catherine Corrigall-Brown


Publications

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Chewinski, Max and Catherine Corrigall–Brown. (2019). Channeling advocacy? Assessing how funding source shapes the strategies of environmental organizations. Social Movement Studies, DOI: 10.1080/14742837.2019.1631153

Chewinski, Max. (2019). “Coordinating Action: NGOs and Grassroots Groups Challenging Canadian Resource Extraction Abroad.” Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations 30(2): 356-368.

Chewinski, Max. (2017). “Activists and the Academy: Making Social Movement Research Useful.” Canadian Review of Sociology 54(3): 363-365.

Chewinski, Max. (2016). “Mining as Canadian Nation-building: Contentious Citizenship Regimes on the Move." Canadian Journal of Sociology 41(3): 349-373.

Book Chapters

Stoddart, Mark, Max Chewinski, B. Quinn Burt and Megan Stewart. (2019). “Political Consumerism in the Oil and Mining Extractive Industries: Possibilities for Sustainability and Social Justice.” Pp. 367-387 in Oxford Handbook of Political Consumerism, edited by Magnus Boström, Michele Micheletti and Peter Oosterveer. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Non-refereed Publications

Chewinski, Max. Nov 4th, 2016. “Liberals failing on duty to hold Canadian mining companies accountable abroad.” National Observer.

Conference Presentations

Chewinski, Max. 2019. “Channeling Advocacy? Assessing how funding source shapes the strategies of environmental organizations.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Political Science Association, June 5, Vancouver, BC and at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, August 12, New York City, NY.

Chewinski, Max. 2017. “Threads that Bind: Explaining Coordinated Action in Social Movements.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, August 14, Montreal, QC.

Chewinski, Max. 2016. “Committing (Phenomenological) Sociology: Actor-centered Approaches to Social Movement Research.” Solicited paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, June 2, Calgary, AB.

Chewinski, Max. 2016. “Knots that Strain and Threads that Bind: NGO-grassroots Dynamics in the Movement Web Challenging Canadian Resource Extractivism.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, June 2, Calgary, AB.

Chewinski, Max. 2016. “The Globe & Mail’s Framing of Idle No More: Challenging the Protest Paradigm.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, June 2, Calgary, AB.

Chewinski, Max. 2014. “Whither the State? Globalization, Citizenship Regimes and Canadian Mining as Nation Building.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, May 30, St. Catherine’s, ON.


Awards

2020        Department of Sociology Research Award, UBC

2020        SAGE Publishing Keith Roberts Teaching Innovations Award

2019         Public Scholars Award, UBC

2019         Department of Sociology Graduate Teaching Award, UBC

2019         Faculty of Arts Graduate Student Research Award, UBC

2018         Department of Sociology Research Award, UBC

2017-20   Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Doctoral Scholarship

2016         Political Sociology and Social Movements Best
Student Paper Award (CSA)

2015         UBC Four Year Fellowship

2014         Environment Research Cluster Best Student Paper
Award (CSA)

2014         Ontario Graduate Scholarship

2013         Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Master's Scholarship


Teaching Experience

Sessional Instructor:

SOCI 464 - Social Movements and Protest

Teaching Assistant:

SOCI 102: Inequality and Social Change
SOCI 217: Research Methods
SOCI 320: Diversity in Family Forms
SOCI 324: Sociology of the Life Course
SOCI 360: Sociology and Natural Resources
SOCI 370: Sociological Theories: Classical and Contemporary Approaches


Max Chewinski

Ph.D. Candidate

Ph.D., Sociology, University of British Columbia

M.A., Sociology, Carleton University, 2015

Honours B.A., Sociology, York University, 2012

My research and writing encompasses the fields of environmental sociology, social movements and political sociology/economy.

Dissertation Research:

On August 4th, 2014, the Mount Polley copper-gold mine owned by Imperial Metals Corp had a catastrophic tailings collapse, sending 24 million cubic meters of tailings into Hazeltine Creek and Quesnel Lake. The disaster constitutes the largest tailings dam collapse in Canadian history, and one of largest in the world in the last 50 years.

My SSHRC-funded dissertation research focuses on how disasters provide opportunities and constraints for political engagement. More specifically, I focus on how:
(1) diverse media sources frame environmental risk, assign blame and promote possible solutions related to the spill over time
(2) how the public has participated in decision-making related to the disaster and subsequent resource management issues and
(3) why some residents have mobilized in response to the disaster while others have not

Supervisor: Dr. Catherine Corrigall-Brown

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Chewinski, Max and Catherine Corrigall–Brown. (2019). Channeling advocacy? Assessing how funding source shapes the strategies of environmental organizations. Social Movement Studies, DOI: 10.1080/14742837.2019.1631153

Chewinski, Max. (2019). “Coordinating Action: NGOs and Grassroots Groups Challenging Canadian Resource Extraction Abroad.” Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations 30(2): 356-368.

Chewinski, Max. (2017). “Activists and the Academy: Making Social Movement Research Useful.” Canadian Review of Sociology 54(3): 363-365.

Chewinski, Max. (2016). “Mining as Canadian Nation-building: Contentious Citizenship Regimes on the Move." Canadian Journal of Sociology 41(3): 349-373.

Book Chapters

Stoddart, Mark, Max Chewinski, B. Quinn Burt and Megan Stewart. (2019). “Political Consumerism in the Oil and Mining Extractive Industries: Possibilities for Sustainability and Social Justice.” Pp. 367-387 in Oxford Handbook of Political Consumerism, edited by Magnus Boström, Michele Micheletti and Peter Oosterveer. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Non-refereed Publications

Chewinski, Max. Nov 4th, 2016. “Liberals failing on duty to hold Canadian mining companies accountable abroad.” National Observer.

Conference Presentations

Chewinski, Max. 2019. “Channeling Advocacy? Assessing how funding source shapes the strategies of environmental organizations.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Political Science Association, June 5, Vancouver, BC and at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, August 12, New York City, NY.

Chewinski, Max. 2017. “Threads that Bind: Explaining Coordinated Action in Social Movements.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, August 14, Montreal, QC.

Chewinski, Max. 2016. “Committing (Phenomenological) Sociology: Actor-centered Approaches to Social Movement Research.” Solicited paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, June 2, Calgary, AB.

Chewinski, Max. 2016. “Knots that Strain and Threads that Bind: NGO-grassroots Dynamics in the Movement Web Challenging Canadian Resource Extractivism.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, June 2, Calgary, AB.

Chewinski, Max. 2016. “The Globe & Mail’s Framing of Idle No More: Challenging the Protest Paradigm.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, June 2, Calgary, AB.

Chewinski, Max. 2014. “Whither the State? Globalization, Citizenship Regimes and Canadian Mining as Nation Building.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, May 30, St. Catherine’s, ON.

2020        Department of Sociology Research Award, UBC

2020        SAGE Publishing Keith Roberts Teaching Innovations Award

2019         Public Scholars Award, UBC

2019         Department of Sociology Graduate Teaching Award, UBC

2019         Faculty of Arts Graduate Student Research Award, UBC

2018         Department of Sociology Research Award, UBC

2017-20   Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Doctoral Scholarship

2016         Political Sociology and Social Movements Best
Student Paper Award (CSA)

2015         UBC Four Year Fellowship

2014         Environment Research Cluster Best Student Paper
Award (CSA)

2014         Ontario Graduate Scholarship

2013         Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Master's Scholarship

Sessional Instructor:

SOCI 464 - Social Movements and Protest

Teaching Assistant:

SOCI 102: Inequality and Social Change
SOCI 217: Research Methods
SOCI 320: Diversity in Family Forms
SOCI 324: Sociology of the Life Course
SOCI 360: Sociology and Natural Resources
SOCI 370: Sociological Theories: Classical and Contemporary Approaches

Max Chewinski

Ph.D. Candidate

Ph.D., Sociology, University of British Columbia

M.A., Sociology, Carleton University, 2015

Honours B.A., Sociology, York University, 2012

My research and writing encompasses the fields of environmental sociology, social movements and political sociology/economy.

Dissertation Research:

On August 4th, 2014, the Mount Polley copper-gold mine owned by Imperial Metals Corp had a catastrophic tailings collapse, sending 24 million cubic meters of tailings into Hazeltine Creek and Quesnel Lake. The disaster constitutes the largest tailings dam collapse in Canadian history, and one of largest in the world in the last 50 years.

My SSHRC-funded dissertation research focuses on how disasters provide opportunities and constraints for political engagement. More specifically, I focus on how:
(1) diverse media sources frame environmental risk, assign blame and promote possible solutions related to the spill over time
(2) how the public has participated in decision-making related to the disaster and subsequent resource management issues and
(3) why some residents have mobilized in response to the disaster while others have not

Supervisor: Dr. Catherine Corrigall-Brown

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Chewinski, Max and Catherine Corrigall–Brown. (2019). Channeling advocacy? Assessing how funding source shapes the strategies of environmental organizations. Social Movement Studies, DOI: 10.1080/14742837.2019.1631153

Chewinski, Max. (2019). “Coordinating Action: NGOs and Grassroots Groups Challenging Canadian Resource Extraction Abroad.” Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations 30(2): 356-368.

Chewinski, Max. (2017). “Activists and the Academy: Making Social Movement Research Useful.” Canadian Review of Sociology 54(3): 363-365.

Chewinski, Max. (2016). “Mining as Canadian Nation-building: Contentious Citizenship Regimes on the Move." Canadian Journal of Sociology 41(3): 349-373.

Book Chapters

Stoddart, Mark, Max Chewinski, B. Quinn Burt and Megan Stewart. (2019). “Political Consumerism in the Oil and Mining Extractive Industries: Possibilities for Sustainability and Social Justice.” Pp. 367-387 in Oxford Handbook of Political Consumerism, edited by Magnus Boström, Michele Micheletti and Peter Oosterveer. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Non-refereed Publications

Chewinski, Max. Nov 4th, 2016. “Liberals failing on duty to hold Canadian mining companies accountable abroad.” National Observer.

Conference Presentations

Chewinski, Max. 2019. “Channeling Advocacy? Assessing how funding source shapes the strategies of environmental organizations.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Political Science Association, June 5, Vancouver, BC and at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, August 12, New York City, NY.

Chewinski, Max. 2017. “Threads that Bind: Explaining Coordinated Action in Social Movements.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, August 14, Montreal, QC.

Chewinski, Max. 2016. “Committing (Phenomenological) Sociology: Actor-centered Approaches to Social Movement Research.” Solicited paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, June 2, Calgary, AB.

Chewinski, Max. 2016. “Knots that Strain and Threads that Bind: NGO-grassroots Dynamics in the Movement Web Challenging Canadian Resource Extractivism.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, June 2, Calgary, AB.

Chewinski, Max. 2016. “The Globe & Mail’s Framing of Idle No More: Challenging the Protest Paradigm.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, June 2, Calgary, AB.

Chewinski, Max. 2014. “Whither the State? Globalization, Citizenship Regimes and Canadian Mining as Nation Building.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association, May 30, St. Catherine’s, ON.

2020        Department of Sociology Research Award, UBC

2020        SAGE Publishing Keith Roberts Teaching Innovations Award

2019         Public Scholars Award, UBC

2019         Department of Sociology Graduate Teaching Award, UBC

2019         Faculty of Arts Graduate Student Research Award, UBC

2018         Department of Sociology Research Award, UBC

2017-20   Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Doctoral Scholarship

2016         Political Sociology and Social Movements Best
Student Paper Award (CSA)

2015         UBC Four Year Fellowship

2014         Environment Research Cluster Best Student Paper
Award (CSA)

2014         Ontario Graduate Scholarship

2013         Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Master's Scholarship

Sessional Instructor:

SOCI 464 - Social Movements and Protest

Teaching Assistant:

SOCI 102: Inequality and Social Change
SOCI 217: Research Methods
SOCI 320: Diversity in Family Forms
SOCI 324: Sociology of the Life Course
SOCI 360: Sociology and Natural Resources
SOCI 370: Sociological Theories: Classical and Contemporary Approaches