Andrea N. Polonijo

Postdoc Research Fellow
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Research Area

Education

Ph.D., Sociology, University of British Columbia, 2018

M.P.H., Health Promotion, University of Toronto, 2009

B.A., Sociology Honours, University of British Columbia, 2007

About

Dr. Polonijo is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre in the UBC School of Nursing. Drawing on her training in sociology and public health, her research focuses on how people’s disease risk and general health are shaped by their social position.


Research Area

Research Interests

Medical sociology; social determinants of health; vaccination; prosocial behavior; quantitative research methods

Current Research

Dr. Polonijo's current research focuses on two key areas:

  1. understanding how differences in vaccination policy, mother-daughter communication, and community-focused attitudes shape social inequalities in vaccination among children and adolescents, and
  2. tracking health inequalities and protective factors for ethnoculturally diverse lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth to inform culturally relevant family interventions.

Publications

Carpiano, Richard M., Andrea N. Polonijo, Nicolas Gilbert, Lyne Cantin, and Eve Dube. (2019, in press). Socioeconomic Status Differences in Parental Vaccination Attitudes and Child Vaccinations: Findings from the 2013 Childhood National Immunization Coverage Survey (CNICS). Preventive Medicinehttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.03.033

Polonijo, Andrea N., Richard M. Carpiano, Paul L. Reiter, and Noel T. Brewer. 2016. “Socioeconomic and Racial-Ethnic Disparities in Prosocial Health Attitudes: The Case of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination for Adolescent Males.“ Journal of Health and Social Behavior 57:390–406. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022146516660344

Rogers, Eamonn, Andrea N. Polonijo, and Richard M. Carpiano. 2016. “Getting by with a Little Help from My Friends (and Colleagues): Testing the Roles of Social Support and Loneliness for Burnout among Medical Residents.” Canadian Family Physician 62:e677–e683. http://www.cfp.ca/content/62/11/e677

Polonijo, Andrea N., and Richard M. Carpiano. 2013. Social Inequalities in Adolescent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination: A Test of Fundamental Cause Theory. Social Science & Medicine 82:115-125. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.12.020

Roberts, Suzanne M., Sandra Jarvis-Selinger, Daniel Pratt, Andrea Polonijo, Andrea, Elizabeth Stacy, Katharine Wisener, and Kevin P. Black. 2012. Reshaping Orthopaedic Resident Education in Systems-Based Practice. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 94:e1121-1127. http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.K.00638

Polonijo, Andrea N., and Brooke A. Hollister. 2011). Normalcy, Boundaries, and Heterosexism: An Exploration of Online Lesbian Health Queries. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 23:165-187.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10538720.2011.560099

Polonijo, Andrea N., and Richard M. Carpiano. 2008. Representations of Cosmetic Surgery and Emotional Health in Women’s Magazines in Canada. Women’s Health Issues, 18:464-471. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.whi.2008.07.004


Awards

  • Graduate Student Fellow, US-UK Medical Sociology Conference (Awarded by the American Sociological Association Medical Sociology Section), 2015
  • Robin Badgley Memorial Student Award (Best Student Paper), Canadian Society for the Sociology of Health 3rd Biennial Bilingual Conference, 2012
  • University of British Columbia 4-Year PhD Fellowship, 2010 – 2014
  • University of British Columbia Faculty of Arts Graduate Award, 2010 & 2013

Andrea N. Polonijo

Postdoc Research Fellow
file_download Download CV

Ph.D., Sociology, University of British Columbia, 2018

M.P.H., Health Promotion, University of Toronto, 2009

B.A., Sociology Honours, University of British Columbia, 2007

Dr. Polonijo is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre in the UBC School of Nursing. Drawing on her training in sociology and public health, her research focuses on how people’s disease risk and general health are shaped by their social position.

Research Interests

Medical sociology; social determinants of health; vaccination; prosocial behavior; quantitative research methods

Current Research

Dr. Polonijo's current research focuses on two key areas:

  1. understanding how differences in vaccination policy, mother-daughter communication, and community-focused attitudes shape social inequalities in vaccination among children and adolescents, and
  2. tracking health inequalities and protective factors for ethnoculturally diverse lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth to inform culturally relevant family interventions.

Carpiano, Richard M., Andrea N. Polonijo, Nicolas Gilbert, Lyne Cantin, and Eve Dube. (2019, in press). Socioeconomic Status Differences in Parental Vaccination Attitudes and Child Vaccinations: Findings from the 2013 Childhood National Immunization Coverage Survey (CNICS). Preventive Medicinehttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.03.033

Polonijo, Andrea N., Richard M. Carpiano, Paul L. Reiter, and Noel T. Brewer. 2016. “Socioeconomic and Racial-Ethnic Disparities in Prosocial Health Attitudes: The Case of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination for Adolescent Males.“ Journal of Health and Social Behavior 57:390–406. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022146516660344

Rogers, Eamonn, Andrea N. Polonijo, and Richard M. Carpiano. 2016. “Getting by with a Little Help from My Friends (and Colleagues): Testing the Roles of Social Support and Loneliness for Burnout among Medical Residents.” Canadian Family Physician 62:e677–e683. http://www.cfp.ca/content/62/11/e677

Polonijo, Andrea N., and Richard M. Carpiano. 2013. Social Inequalities in Adolescent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination: A Test of Fundamental Cause Theory. Social Science & Medicine 82:115-125. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.12.020

Roberts, Suzanne M., Sandra Jarvis-Selinger, Daniel Pratt, Andrea Polonijo, Andrea, Elizabeth Stacy, Katharine Wisener, and Kevin P. Black. 2012. Reshaping Orthopaedic Resident Education in Systems-Based Practice. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 94:e1121-1127. http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.K.00638

Polonijo, Andrea N., and Brooke A. Hollister. 2011). Normalcy, Boundaries, and Heterosexism: An Exploration of Online Lesbian Health Queries. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 23:165-187.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10538720.2011.560099

Polonijo, Andrea N., and Richard M. Carpiano. 2008. Representations of Cosmetic Surgery and Emotional Health in Women’s Magazines in Canada. Women’s Health Issues, 18:464-471. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.whi.2008.07.004

  • Graduate Student Fellow, US-UK Medical Sociology Conference (Awarded by the American Sociological Association Medical Sociology Section), 2015
  • Robin Badgley Memorial Student Award (Best Student Paper), Canadian Society for the Sociology of Health 3rd Biennial Bilingual Conference, 2012
  • University of British Columbia 4-Year PhD Fellowship, 2010 – 2014
  • University of British Columbia Faculty of Arts Graduate Award, 2010 & 2013

Andrea N. Polonijo

Postdoc Research Fellow
file_download Download CV

Ph.D., Sociology, University of British Columbia, 2018

M.P.H., Health Promotion, University of Toronto, 2009

B.A., Sociology Honours, University of British Columbia, 2007

Dr. Polonijo is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre in the UBC School of Nursing. Drawing on her training in sociology and public health, her research focuses on how people’s disease risk and general health are shaped by their social position.

Research Interests

Medical sociology; social determinants of health; vaccination; prosocial behavior; quantitative research methods

Current Research

Dr. Polonijo's current research focuses on two key areas:

  1. understanding how differences in vaccination policy, mother-daughter communication, and community-focused attitudes shape social inequalities in vaccination among children and adolescents, and
  2. tracking health inequalities and protective factors for ethnoculturally diverse lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth to inform culturally relevant family interventions.

Carpiano, Richard M., Andrea N. Polonijo, Nicolas Gilbert, Lyne Cantin, and Eve Dube. (2019, in press). Socioeconomic Status Differences in Parental Vaccination Attitudes and Child Vaccinations: Findings from the 2013 Childhood National Immunization Coverage Survey (CNICS). Preventive Medicinehttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.03.033

Polonijo, Andrea N., Richard M. Carpiano, Paul L. Reiter, and Noel T. Brewer. 2016. “Socioeconomic and Racial-Ethnic Disparities in Prosocial Health Attitudes: The Case of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination for Adolescent Males.“ Journal of Health and Social Behavior 57:390–406. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022146516660344

Rogers, Eamonn, Andrea N. Polonijo, and Richard M. Carpiano. 2016. “Getting by with a Little Help from My Friends (and Colleagues): Testing the Roles of Social Support and Loneliness for Burnout among Medical Residents.” Canadian Family Physician 62:e677–e683. http://www.cfp.ca/content/62/11/e677

Polonijo, Andrea N., and Richard M. Carpiano. 2013. Social Inequalities in Adolescent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination: A Test of Fundamental Cause Theory. Social Science & Medicine 82:115-125. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.12.020

Roberts, Suzanne M., Sandra Jarvis-Selinger, Daniel Pratt, Andrea Polonijo, Andrea, Elizabeth Stacy, Katharine Wisener, and Kevin P. Black. 2012. Reshaping Orthopaedic Resident Education in Systems-Based Practice. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 94:e1121-1127. http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.K.00638

Polonijo, Andrea N., and Brooke A. Hollister. 2011). Normalcy, Boundaries, and Heterosexism: An Exploration of Online Lesbian Health Queries. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 23:165-187.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10538720.2011.560099

Polonijo, Andrea N., and Richard M. Carpiano. 2008. Representations of Cosmetic Surgery and Emotional Health in Women’s Magazines in Canada. Women’s Health Issues, 18:464-471. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.whi.2008.07.004

  • Graduate Student Fellow, US-UK Medical Sociology Conference (Awarded by the American Sociological Association Medical Sociology Section), 2015
  • Robin Badgley Memorial Student Award (Best Student Paper), Canadian Society for the Sociology of Health 3rd Biennial Bilingual Conference, 2012
  • University of British Columbia 4-Year PhD Fellowship, 2010 – 2014
  • University of British Columbia Faculty of Arts Graduate Award, 2010 & 2013